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Author Topic:   now I've really seen it all on eBay ....
akgdc

Posts: 289
Registered: Sep 2001

iconnumber posted 02-18-2003 10:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for akgdc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Did anyone else notice this featured item?
2509670326

It is, if you believe the sellers' breathless description, a "100% original" "16th or 17th century chalice" "brought back here to Maine from Brazil in the 19th century." Complete with a mysterious coat of arms engraved on the front, they tell us.

Well .... that mysterious coat of arms is, of course, nothing less than the logo of the Plaza Hotel on Central Park South! Our fabled chalice is an old plated hotel-silver sugar bowl. Now, I wonder how it ended up in Brazil ....

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Scott Martin
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Posts: 10449
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 02-18-2003 11:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is truly outrageous. I am sure we will be talking about this for years to come. So before it is gone ......
quote:
Ebay 2509670326 Seller: brulin
16th, 17th, Century Coin Silver Chalice

We clean houses out here in Western Maine. We found this Chalice yesterday here in Western Maine. It weighs about 3/4 of a pound, and measures 4 3/4" high by 5 1/8" wide. The people we got it from said it was brought back here to Maine from Brazil in the 19th century, we have no reason not to believe them. It shows great honest old wear and age, we see no repairs or damage whatsoever, it's 100% original. The coat of arms or monogram was struck and not engraved, the filigree around the outside was probably hand struck separately, at the same time. The impression of the strike shows on the inside of the bowl. There are no hallmarks, which makes us think it was made here in the Americas and not in Europe, although plenty of coin silver was shipped to Europe and worked into many different forms in the 16th and 17th century. The base and top were made separately and than attached. The inside bottom where it goes up to the curved part of the base and shows very fine spun marks. The rounded part of the base, that attaches to the top piece,is definitely hand hammered, the hammering shows on both sides. What its origin is we can only guess, let us know what you think and we'll pass it on. People out there, pay attention, this is not an 18th or 19th century piece of silver. We have no problem with our 16th or 17th century attribution, everything about it points to it, that's not saying it couldn't be earlier. We know that's stretching it, you make up your own mind. Oh! by the way, it goes with out saying, this is solid coin silver, not plated.


Can you say Brazil nut?

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akgdc

Posts: 289
Registered: Sep 2001

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 07:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for akgdc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I emailed the seller and his response was:

"You may very well be right, but I don't think so, stay tuned, we'll both
know in seven days, If you find any more, I'm a buyer."

Anyone got any old hotel silver around the house? We can try taking him up on his offer.

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akgdc

Posts: 289
Registered: Sep 2001

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 07:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for akgdc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Amazing ... the thing already has lots of bids and is up to 10 times its actual value. (Of course, that still isn't terribly much).

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vathek

Posts: 903
Registered: Jun 99

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 07:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for vathek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you look at their other items, they all seem honestly described. This may be an instance of owning a real "strad" violin.

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dragonflywink

Posts: 878
Registered: Dec 2002

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 08:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dragonflywink     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I emailed the seller with three closed auction numbers showing the Plaza logo (including a menu dated 1934) and his response to me was that 3 years ago they sold 2900 coins, many 16th & 17th century. "We're not experts, but we think this piece is very old." Says when he taps it with a pencil, it "rings like a bell" and that the monogram is hand struck and not done all at once. He does very nicely point out that everything they sell is returnable, no questions asked , "so nobody will get hurt".

Makes me think of a quote I heard years ago something along the lines of "The theories we believe are facts, and the facts we don't believe are theories". The man holds strong to his beliefs!

I recently sold a nice little demitasse spoon from the Mayflower Hotel, guess I should have described it as having come over on the ship in 1620. Oh well, too late now!

Cheryl ;o)

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Scott Martin
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Posts: 10449
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 09:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree that the seller's other listed silver is reasonably accurate, all be they limited in description. Assuming the seller doesn't know their silver, then by not over describing the silver their descriptions could be characterized as honest.

But with the "chalice" the description and attributions are significant and imply a level of expertise. An unknowledgeable bidder could be relying upon the seller's expertise. I know, I know .... say caveat emptor and blame the bidder.

Just looking at the "chalice" photos it looks as if it is white metal and all the silverplate is gone. How did the seller determine it was "Oh! by the way, it goes with out saying, this is solid coin silver, not plated." If they don't know for sure and are wishfully guessing can that be called honest?

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labarbedor

Posts: 353
Registered: Jun 2002

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 09:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for labarbedor     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have been over on the coin silver forum, I had no idea how much fun you people were having over here. While I sold several milk crates of hotel silver recently for very little money (bad condition), I am not so sure the piece isn't being bought by a hotel silver collector. If it goes up much higher is anyone going to have the guts to tell the buyer what it is? Here is a trick question, was there spunn silver in the 18th century?

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 10:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
FYI - The Plaza opened its doors on October 1, 1907.

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akgdc

Posts: 289
Registered: Sep 2001

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 11:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for akgdc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I challenged the seller to live up to his promise to "let us know what you think and we'll pass it on" ... and to his credit, he did, and posted what I'd sent him as part of his description. But he's still sticking to his guns ... his latest theory is that the Plaza Hotel copied its logo from his chalice. Stay tuned!

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 01:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here are the additions to the eBay listing

quote:
On Feb-19-03 at 07:29:04 PST, seller added the following information:

This is what someone e-mailed us about this piece: (Uh, I hate to break the news to you, but your "chalice" is actually a silverplate sugar bowl, circa late 20th century, from the Plaza Hotel in New York. That "coat of arms" is the Plaza's logo, as you'll see if you visit the hotel's homepage, plazahotel.com. Now, I wonder how it ended up in 19th-century Maine ) Our only comment is, we know hotel items show much use, but how, in such a short time, could a piece like this have not hundreds, but thousands of scattered, minute nicks, scratches, dents, and what looks like hundreds of years of wear from being hand handled. The monogram is worn smooth from it, if it was a sugar bowl it wouldn't have been handled more than a few times a day. As far as the monogram goes, whoever designed it for the Plaza Hotel may have gotten the design from a book of early Coat of Arms or monograms, companies still do it today. One last thing, this monogram was struck by hand and not all at once. The filigree or outside design was hand hammered one at a time. We did look up the New York Plaza site on the internet and did find their monogram, at best it's a poor modernized, you might say "the Art Deco look", facsimile or copy of the one that's on this piece, it's definitely not the same. Stay tuned, if anything, it's interesting. We'll keep you up to date.

----------------------------------

On Feb-19-03 at 09:32:45 PST, seller added the following information:

This is the answer we gave the person who said this was a sugar bowl from the Plaza hotel from the late 20th century: (We're just going around and around with this, and we're not out to hurt anyone, as you can see by our feedback, so we might as well wait and see. We guarantee everything and give refunds with no questions asked. I don't understand how if the wear is from a dishwasher how it didn't do the same to the underpart which shows little wear. Even if it was done by hand, being washed with other items would make the wear consistent on all parts. Also you would never have an uncovered sugar bowl in a hotel or restaurant. This never, at anytime, had a cover.)


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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 02:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Adam (akgdc),

Since the seller seems sincere, you might suggest that they join us here in this discussion. If you do, please help them to understand that we don't want to become the research arm of their online business.

Scott

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akgdc

Posts: 289
Registered: Sep 2001

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 05:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for akgdc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Scott, I did email him and point him to this discussion. I also suggested he should have it tested for silver content. Now he has added a statement to the listing saying it tests as silver. Lord only knows how they came up with that. Well, at least you have to admire the guy's persistence ....

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 06:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The additions by the seller:
quote:
On Feb-19-03 at 13:58:00 PST, seller added the following information:

To all of you people out there. we've solved the mystery of the Park Plaza Hotel theory. We brought this chalice to Pa's Trading Company Inc. 1190 Main Street Oxford, Maine, probably the largest gold and silver dealer here in Western Maine and had them test this for silver. I personally watched him acid test the chalice in three places, all three turned up gray, also watched him test by rubbing on a touch stone, also from three places, all turned up gray. I have a signed affidavit, on his letter head, which will go with the chalice and reads: I have tested a bowl for Bruce Richards with acid and a touch stone and in my opinion believe it is silver. Paul Cote 1190 Main Street Oxford, Maine 04268. By the way he does have a phone and is willing to verify it to anyone who calls him. We knew it was silver when we listed it, this just proves it. We stick to our original description.

-------------------------------------

On Feb-19-03 at 14:19:39 PST, seller added the following information:

By the way, if anyone out there cares, I am a retired local Massachusetts Law Enforcement Officer. I do know what theft by deception is, especially using the US mails, just thought I'd mention it.


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akgdc

Posts: 289
Registered: Sep 2001

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 06:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for akgdc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
just to clarify: I didn't accuse this fellow of deception by mail or anything of the sort. Our exchanges have been polite.

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dragonflywink

Posts: 878
Registered: Dec 2002

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 08:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dragonflywink     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My single exchange with this gentleman was also cordial. I suggested that the piece was early twentieth century, not "late twentieth" as he says in his additions to the description. I never suggested that he was attempting to defraud anyone.

His pictures are quite clear and it appears to me that the photos of the inside of the bowl show many small spots where the plating is off and showing white metal. I have owned old pieces with very heavy plating where the engraving and even makers marks have been worn into virtual obscurity from polishing and use, yet they are still not down to base metal. I know from experience that the plating on most hotel and railroad pieces is quite heavy (to stand up to commercial cleaning), would the acid test show this as silver, so long as the acid didn't remain on long enough to eat through? As my jeweler friend Glenn says "Lord, protect me from all the novices with a touchstone and bottles of acid" (he was including me!). That said, the seller states that the acid "turned up gray" when tested, isn't the color for silver supposed to be red or brown (depending on the fineness)?

Cheryl

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Paul Lemieux

Posts: 1732
Registered: Apr 2000

iconnumber posted 02-19-2003 11:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul Lemieux     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, real silver should turn reddish with the acid test.

I also find it interesting that such a (relatively) recent piece of hotel plate has acquired such a convoluted provenance.

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FredZ

Posts: 1067
Registered: Jun 99

iconnumber posted 02-20-2003 12:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FredZ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"None so blind as those who will not see."

Reminds me of the man who claimed he was dead and when his friend asked if dead men bled the man exclaimed "Of course not!" His friend pricked the man's finger and it began to bleed. His friend then asked what do you make of this?.... The man's response was "What do you know? I guess dead men DO bleed."

We will not be able to prove anything to those who do not wish to be told.

This is a facinating tale we are wittnessing.

[This message has been edited by FredZ (edited 02-20-2003).]

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-20-2003 08:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The sellers lastest additions:
quote:
On Feb-19-03 at 15:18:51 PST, seller added the following information:

We forgot to mention that we had this tested today, after several inquiries, and the affidavit is dated 2/19/03.

On Feb-19-03 at 16:54:01 PST, seller added the following information:

We have had so many pros and cons and controversy over this item that we feel you should treat this as a circa 1975 piece of hotel junk, that's what the majority of E-mails are telling us. In over 6000 items we've sold on E-bay, we've never stopped an auction for any reason whatsoever
and really don't want to now. As we've said before if you don't like the item for any reason, send it back for a complete refund, no questions asked. We won't hold anybody to any bids they may have made. Hopefully this will put closure on this mess we got ourselves in. Believe us our intentions were honorable. Thank you out there for the pros and the cons. I guess this is what makes life interesting, have a good evening. Bruce


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labarbedor

Posts: 353
Registered: Jun 2002

iconnumber posted 02-20-2003 11:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for labarbedor     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I personally will be sorry to see this piece go.

There are several different types of silver acid. I use an old mixture that has several advantages. It stays unchanged on high grade silver and gets progressively whiter on lesser quality silver. Plated items if scratched or nicked turn black immediately. It is still difficult to test very thick French plate. I believe it is very hard to come by this acid, so don't ask.

I am not sure about the legal problems, but maybe there should be a forum for the most outrageously described piece of silver on eBay each week. The winner could have the fun of being appointed to give the bad news to the owner.

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-20-2003 02:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The sellers latest additions:
quote:
On Feb-20-03 at 10:55:40 PST, seller added the following information:

Last night some one recommended we file a spot on the bottom inside rim to see if it was plated. we did, I took a thin metal file and filed a V cut half way through from the inside to the outside of rim. I took a strong magnifying glass and could see no sign of plating whatsoever. Whatever kind of metal this is, it's solid all the way through, it's definitely not plated. Also we took a close look at the inside bottom. We now think it was not spun as we mentioned in our earlier description. We also noticed that the bottom was made in two pieces and soldered together. The top part that's soldered to the bowl is hand hammered, the bottom half piece that meets the table is not hand hammered. You'll have to admit, if anything, whose having more fun than we are. My wife is so mad at me over this, that if she didn't love me, she'd throw me out, in fact she may anyway.

Stay tuned for tomorrows episode. This is getting more like the soaps on T.V., the people die off of old age before it ever ends.


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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-21-2003 09:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
today the seller added:
quote:
On Feb-20-03 at 15:12:17 PST, seller added the following information:

People out there don't you think by now if this was a sugar bowl from the late 20th century and from the Park Plaza Hotel in New York we would have heard from someone saying they have one or maybe a hundred of these or would at least remember seeing one. This was made all by hand, do you really think a hotel would pay some firm to make a hundred of these, being that it's hand soldered, hand hammered, etc. and probably would have been stolen before it ever wore out. Soldering like this is a lost art that went out with the pewters and tinsmiths in the 2nd half of the 19th century. We don't think anybody who lived in the 20th century would even begin to know how to make an item like this by hand. By the way we've had more E-mails about this than any of the 6000 items we sold on E-bay. Stay tuned it gets more interesting day by day. My wife says I never should have brought it home, I should have thrown it out the window on the way.


I can't tell you how many times I should have (or wished I had) listened to my wife wink

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-22-2003 08:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
the seller has added:

quote:
On Feb-21-03 at 17:57:47 PST, seller added the following information:

Still waiting, we haven't heard a word from anyone yet, stating that this piece was ever owned or made for the Park Plaza Hotel, New York. We even have people telling us this is pewter, we don't think so, when tapped by a pencil, it has a fine high pitched bell ring to it. If we do hear, you'll be the first to know. We've also had people tell us that it was old, but not anywhere as old as we claimed, I'll bet they're right.


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FredZ

Posts: 1067
Registered: Jun 99

iconnumber posted 02-22-2003 09:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FredZ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This guy is an interesting character... He says he has filed a "V" in the bottom rim of the item and viewed it through a magnifying glass. I wonder what the high bidder will think of this drastic measure. I have found way too many antiques that were nicked in this fashion by the uniformed. I have to hand it to the seller. He has managed to capture the attention of some savy folks and is providing an interesting focus of discussion.

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wev
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iconnumber posted 02-23-2003 08:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for wev     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Snow-bound in Maine, the saga continues:

quote:
On Feb-23-03 at 15:22:48 PST, seller added the following information:

People out there, give this some thought, can you imagine going to a fine hotel like the Park Plaza in New York City, sitting down to a fine dinner and having this beat up, worn to the bone and what looks like a piece of worn out junk in front of you, surrounded by hand polished, silver plated utensils, a clean table cloth, a linen napkin, a good French wine, etc. They would have thrown this in the trash before it looked anything like this. Imagine, putting sugar in your coffee or anything else edible out of this. It wouldn't be anyplace I'd take my first date. Also the Park Plaza surrounding motif on their logo is acorns, this has handstruck serrated leaves. Beleive me, I do know the difference between handstruck and engraved. Don't forget alot of 18th and early 19th century American silver is not signed. Everything we sell is always returnable including what it cost you to send it back, that goes for anywhere in the world. We've had plenty of time to put this on, we're snowed in and it's still snowing here in Maine.


But he forgets that trip to Brazil -- a wearing journey even for a retired sugar. . .

[This message has been edited by wev (edited 02-23-2003).]

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akgdc

Posts: 289
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iconnumber posted 02-24-2003 04:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for akgdc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm enjoying this whole show so much I'm half inclined to buy the damn thing myself.

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FredZ

Posts: 1067
Registered: Jun 99

iconnumber posted 02-24-2003 05:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FredZ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Someone from the forum needs to win the bid on this. It is the only way we will know for sure what it is! I would wager that this eBay item has raised more interest than many of the things posted here.

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jt251

Posts: 25
Registered: Sep 2002

iconnumber posted 02-24-2003 09:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jt251     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'll be happy to pitch in $5.00 for a group purchase.

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-24-2003 10:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
THe most recent from the seller:
quote:
On Feb-24-03 at 18:31:59 PST, seller added the following information:

The consensus of 90% of our E-mails is that this is probably 20th century and at the most 50 to 75 years old, we have no reason to doubt them.

We're sorry for any inconvenience we may have caused. My wife keeps telling me "I told you so", now that I've reached 70 she thinks I'm in my second childhood. My grandson says he's even embarrassed. My dog just kinds of sits there and looks at me funny like. Oh well I'll just get in trouble again over something else, and they'll forget all about it. Hope you people will too.

FINIS Bruce


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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-24-2003 10:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would love to get this item into my hands .... but I have learned to listen to my wife. She knows I am headstrong so I am sure she will expect me to contribute. Who will take the lead and do our bidding? Count me in for $10 bucks. biggrin

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labarbedor

Posts: 353
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iconnumber posted 02-24-2003 10:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for labarbedor     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am sorry to disagree, but the truth is everyong knows what this is, I would bet the price it brings ten times over. The owner is taking it very well, he is a character, I like him, but come on this is a piece of hotel silver. I am just sorry I sold four crates of the stuff earlier this year, or I would send all involved a piece.

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Stephen

Posts: 625
Registered: Jan 2003

iconnumber posted 02-25-2003 12:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Stephen     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Dolan's "American Sterling Silver Flatware":
quote:
Dominick & Haff ... neglected no opportunity. As with many other such manufacturers they sold large quantities of what is now called "hotel silver", but unlike many other silver companies D & H were extremely proud of this aspect of their production. In 1907, an advertisement boasts that "the order placed with us for the new Plaza Hotel, New York City, will be the finest and most extensive service of the kind ever produced."

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-25-2003 01:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One more by the seller:
quote:
On Feb-24-03 at 19:27:51 PST, seller added the following information:

My five cats just came in from the barn, I asked them what they thought about the whole thing. They said they didn't much give a damm, one way or the other. They seemed to know all about it, kind of talked it over among themselves, like cats do, the cats they know, we're still friends.


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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 02-25-2003 04:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well the auction ended with redshoesauctions being the high bidder at $57. This might be a new high for hotel plate (I wouldn't know).

Does anyone know redshoesauctions? This was so much fun to watch. wink Might we be hearing about or seeing this item again?

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Paul Lemieux

Posts: 1732
Registered: Apr 2000

iconnumber posted 12-15-2003 03:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul Lemieux     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Epilogue: I was browsing through old posts and found this one. I thought I would check the feedback profile of brulin (the seller). Here's what the winning bidder of the "chalice" said, a couple months after the auction actually ended:
quote:

A top notch seller. A man of true integrity, not to mention great sense of humor

I think we can read this to mean that the item was returned for a refund. wink

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Marc

Posts: 414
Registered: Jun 2002

iconnumber posted 12-21-2003 12:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oh my goodness..

What a way to end my day.

Such fun.

Marc

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agleopar

Posts: 758
Registered: Jun 2004

iconnumber posted 03-08-2010 12:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for agleopar     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This one is priceless! I love the way he throws in little things like "it rings like a bell..." to show that it might just be the real thing.

Has anyone seen the "early american apostle" spoon for a buy it now price of $3333? It seems to have been on for years and I can't find it now, I hope no one really bought a 19c german spoon for that price??

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Hose_dk

Posts: 385
Registered: May 2008

iconnumber posted 04-28-2011 12:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hose_dk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That is a great story - I love that seller. First he gives his point, and stick to that. To the best of his knowledge. What more can you expect?

Then he add information - as he starts getting the picture. I respect that.

One cannot be expected to give more than he is capable of.
That kind of man is OK to do business with.

Add the sense of humor. Sorry that I was not on eBay at that time. The story is worth more than selling price.

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 01-06-2013 04:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Every few months or whenever I need to smile, I give this read. biggrin

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doc

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iconnumber posted 01-06-2013 08:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for doc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I never tire of this!!

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Kimo

Posts: 1464
Registered: Mar 2003

iconnumber posted 01-07-2013 11:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kimo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is always a real rib tickler to re-read. On the positive side, at least that seller back then did not claim his 'chalice' to be the actual holy grail. smile

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Scott Martin
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Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 01-12-2017 08:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bump ... its been 4 years since the last bump biggrin
quote:
Originally posted by Scott Martin:
Every few months or whenever I need to smile, I give this read.

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cbc58

Posts: 100
Registered: Aug 2008

iconnumber posted 01-12-2017 09:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cbc58     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am fairly new to collecting but have discovered that at least 15% of the items that I see for sale are misidentified/fakes or reproductions trying to pass off as originals.

Someone was selling a "1700's rare and early" inkwell by a famous maker, and it was clearly stamped "weighted" on the side. Another was a group of spoons made "circa 1800" where the maker hadn't been born until 1833 and started practicing in 1855.

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doc

Posts: 679
Registered: Jul 2003

iconnumber posted 01-12-2017 07:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for doc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hehehe! I forgot about this one! And I particularly love that Pa's Trading Post is cited as the expert; I lived in Western Maine for many years, and shopped there regularly, but would never have described them as experts! I probably even met this fellow at some point. What a classic!

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Scott Martin
Forum Master

Posts: 10449
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 01-22-2017 02:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Hello Red Shoes Auctions,

We were wondering if you are the same Red Shoes Auctions mentioned in this story and whether there was more you could add to the story.
now I've really seen it all on eBay ....

Thank you,
SM Publications


quote:
Dear SMP,

Yes, that was me. I do remember having that item in my possession for a short time, but I barely remember the details. Based on what I wrote for feedback, my best guess would be that I took it to the person that I was sure would buy it if it was anything good, and got the same reaction that everyone on the silver thread had. (20th century hotel ware) With nothing to lose by taking the chance, I figured, why not? The guy refunded my money, so nothing ventured, nothing gained. Sorry, not a very exciting end to your story.

Sincerely,
Mike "Red Shoes" G.


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