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Author Topic:   Pattern name?
Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 08:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
[20-0090 16-0155]

witzhall posted 04-24-2006 07:29 AM in the New Members' forum

quote:
My father is still very much alive at 92, so I enjoy my silver inheritance at his house! Among other items there that I love is this Tiffany salad set.




I don't know anything to speak of about Tiffany but the pattern is really beautiful, I think - so different from the plain 18th century silver that I'm more familiar with. I'm hoping that someone can tell me the name of the pattern and when it might have been made. I think the set was a wedding present to my grandparents in 1912. TIA!


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Richard Kurtzman
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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 11:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Richard Kurtzman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Your salad set is the Vine pattern introduced in 1872. It's a multi motif pattern and this motif is peapod. According to Hood et al, the pattern became inactive before 1904 and obsolete as of February 2, 1934.

[This message has been edited by Richard Kurtzman (edited 04-24-2006).]

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witzhall

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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 03:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for witzhall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you, Richard, for that info; I think I'll have to pin my father down a bit as to the set's history.

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IJP

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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 06:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for IJP     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's a little background information for witzhall...

Silver designs of this kind are representative of the Aesthetic (or Japanesque) style. For over 200 years, the Japanese hardly communicated or traded with Western countries. By the 1850's Commodore Perry of the U.S. Naval fleet had arrived in Japan to continue with America's (up-to-then failed) efforts to negotiate a treaty to encourage this. Perry more or less opened up Japan's ports by force, threatening to engage them if refused. Since Japan hadn't kept up with the West's developments in warfare technology, the Japanese fleets, if any, were laughably inferior to the American gunboats, and the Japanese were forced to concede (These events later lead to Japan's "learning" of Western ways, and the country's later invasion campaigns of east Asia, and even eventually lead to Pearl Harbor—Though that's too broad and unrelated a topic for discussion here).

As a result of the Treaty of Kanagawa and other agreements, Japan would communicate and trade with the West, and reveal a number of design styles and alloying techniques that were previously unknown in the West, i.e. mokume, shakudo, shibuichi, etc. This created quite a stir in the world of Western silver design, and during the 1870's and 1880's, this style became very fashionable.

Typical features of Aesthetic Movement silver are hammered finishes, nature-inspired designs (plants, bugs, etc.), and sometimes applied mixed-metals and mixed-metal alloys.

No Aesthetic Period silver is especially common, but holloware items of this style, especially those with mixed-metals, are exceptionally rare and highly desirable. I've handled relatively few (holloware) pieces myself, but all were generally high-quality pieces.

The only Aesthetic holloware I can presently show to demonstrate other works in this style, is this Dominick & Haff water pitcher, which now belongs to a local doctor who sometimes visits with me to show me other really amazing pieces in his collection.

The chased dragonfly, spider, and plants, as well as the hammered surface, are very representative of the style.

Sorry about the image size! I confused the limit with that for the site where my images are uploaded—which allows a max 600 pixel-width (and also displays the somewhat less adequate 250 pixel-width size as well). I should know better by now!

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witzhall

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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 07:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for witzhall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
IJP, how fascinating! I didn't know about any of that history and it sheds a completely new light on my father's pieces. Now I'm going to show what a complete neophyte I am (if that's not already obvious ...) - is the work by Shiebler related to the Aesthetic style? I've only seen the photos that are in the Shiebler forum, never any actual pieces; but those appear to have some of the characteristics you've described and the time frame seems to be about the same.

The Dominick & Haff pitcher is amazing! Thanks for sharing that image and your knowledge.

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hello

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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 08:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for hello     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
yum, and yes I would say the work of shiebler is very related to the aesthetic taste, which is more of a style and could pertain to many different companies.

[This message has been edited by hello (edited 04-24-2006).]

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Richard Kurtzman
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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 09:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Richard Kurtzman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Tiffany, Gorham, Whiting, Shiebler, Dominick & Haff, to some extent Wood & Hughes (These were the majors.) and others all did pieces in the Aestheic taste. This design style was but one small fraction of their total production.

[This message has been edited by Richard Kurtzman (edited 04-24-2006).]

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witzhall

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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 10:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for witzhall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, hello and Richard - one of the trickiest but also most rewarding parts of learning about silver, for me anyway, is trying to figure out how the stylistic and functional and economic aspects of development, for starters, relate to all the other components of the decorative arts as well as to the larger considerations of demographics and geography and politics, and on and on. How does all of civilization's history fit together, or not? It's pretty mind-boggling!

[This message has been edited by witzhall (edited 04-24-2006).]

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witzhall

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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 10:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for witzhall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Was just looking at the acid etching thread in this forum, with the beautiful pictures from William Hood. It looks as if perhaps my father's salad set had been decorated by acid etching - is that possible? Or were the peapods et al cast? Or something altogether different?

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Richard Kurtzman
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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 10:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Richard Kurtzman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
witzhall,

In light of what you just said, I think that you would find "Silver In America 1840-1940" by Charles Venable interesting and enlightening It's probably the best book on 19th and early 20th century American silver and it covers some of the aspects that you just mentioned. I highly recommend it.

It's also profusely illustrated and a treat for the eye.

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William Hood

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iconnumber posted 04-24-2006 11:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for William Hood     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Am just returning from traveling, and can now enter this discussion. The Japanese style was introduced into American silver by Gorham, who produced some small bowls with Japanesque engraved decoration in 1869. Tiffany introduced the first Japanesque flatware in April 1871. The pattern, called "Japanese," had at least 18 die-stamped handle motifs depicting five identifiable birds and three fictional birds in various postures. In June 1871 Gorham introduced its own "Japanese" flatware pattern. This had 12 different handle motifs with multiple subjects, only four with birds. The Japanesque "Vine" pattern, introduced by Tiffany in 1872, had 13 different die-struck handle motifs (various fruits, flowers and one grain--wheat). Your salad set has the "peapod" motif. Tiffany later produced many different not full-line flatware patterns in the Japanese style and one major full-line pattern ("Lap Over Edge"), the latter decorated by multiple techniques, including acid-etching. Although most of the handles were machine-stamped, none of the decoration was imparted by this method. Gorham went on to produce several other flatware patterns in the Japanese style, including "Hamburg," "Curio/Cairo," and "Hizen." And, as Richard points out, other makers, including Whiting, Shiebler, Duhme, and others also produced flatware in this style. The hollowware by Tiffany, Gorham, Whiting, and Dominick & Haff in the Japanese taste (mostly with applied decoration) is more famous than their flatware. To read more about Tiffany's "Vine" and "Japanese" flatware, suggest you consult the book "Tiffany Silver Flatware, 1845-1905: When Dining Was an Art."

[This message has been edited by William Hood (edited 04-24-2006).]

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hello

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iconnumber posted 04-25-2006 07:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for hello     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I second the suggested reading of "Silver In America 1840-1940" and "Tiffany Silver Flatware, 1845-1905: When Dining Was an Art," only be warned, after you do you might be hooked!

[This message has been edited by hello (edited 04-25-2006).]

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witzhall

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iconnumber posted 04-25-2006 02:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for witzhall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you, Richard and William, for the reading suggestions; William, for the additional information you've contributed (very interesting); and hello, for the cautionary note: forewarned is forearmed! (I am already infected by the Tiffany bug to a degree, since I am fortunate enough to have silver flatware in the "Faneuil" pattern.)

[This message has been edited by witzhall (edited 04-25-2006).]

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salmoned

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iconnumber posted 04-25-2006 07:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for salmoned     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just wanted to add that I quite enjoyed this thread as well.

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Dale

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iconnumber posted 04-25-2006 10:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dale     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Some of the larger serving pieces in Vine feature a grape vine motif. It is my understanding that these were offered periodically over the years as isolated gift items. They popup frequently in strange places and are always great looking. There is a berry shell, flat server and something else. For a while OJ Kroeger in KC and a whole bunch of them he had gotten on a closeout.

In US silverplate there is quite a bit of Aesthetic ware. Tufts and Pairpoint produced many items for this taste.

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William Hood

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iconnumber posted 04-25-2006 10:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for William Hood     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Grapevine is one of the thirteen handle motifs in the Vine pattern. As far as I am aware, the only place piece with the grapevine motif is the tablespoon. All the other pieces with this motif are serving pieces. See "Tiffany Silver Flatware, 1845-1905: When Dining Was an Art," Chapter 5, and especially Table 4, pp. 192-193.

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