SMP Logo
SM Publications
Silver Salon Forums - The premier site for discussing Silver.
SMP | Silver Salon Forums | SSF - Guidelines | SSF - FAQ | Silver Sales

The Silver Salon Forums
Since 1993
Over 11,793 threads & 64,769 posts !!
American Sterling Silver Forum
How to Post Photos REGISTER (click here)

customtitle open  SMP Silver Salon Forums
tlineopen  American Sterling Silver
tline3open  Gorham Chantilly Corn Fork

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

ForumFriend SSFFriend: Email This Page to Someone! next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Gorham Chantilly Corn Fork
R. Burns

Posts: 2
Registered: Aug 2005

iconnumber posted 08-15-2005 06:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for R. Burns     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
[01-2462]

Have recently purchased Chantilly Corn Fork with all the proper markings. How were these used? One can not eat with it, the tines are too sharp. The tines do not seem to be strong enough to cut and rake kernels off the cob. And the open work in the bowl would allow kernels to fall through if ussed as a server. Any help with this would be appreciated.

IP: Logged

Bob and Carol Carnighan

Posts: 63
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 08-15-2005 07:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob and Carol Carnighan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Chantilly corn forks are very rare. We would very much like to see an image.

IP: Logged

R. Burns

Posts: 2
Registered: Aug 2005

iconnumber posted 08-15-2005 07:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for R. Burns     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sorry, do not have digital and if I did, I wouldn't know how to send image.

IP: Logged

Ulysses Dietz
Moderator

Posts: 1265
Registered: May 99

iconnumber posted 08-16-2005 08:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ulysses Dietz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd like to know what a corn fork was supposedly used for. If we know they're rare, then we know why Gorham made them. Or, possibly, is it just a fabricated object, like a "baked potato fork." I was horrified to see that Replacements Ltd. will MAKE a baked potato fork for you (meaning they'll butcher a good fork to make this nonsense). So, what's a corn fork?

IP: Logged

Paul Lemieux

Posts: 1755
Registered: Apr 2000

iconnumber posted 08-16-2005 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul Lemieux     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I do not know if I have heard of a corn fork before. Sounds interesting.

What are the dimensions? From your description, I am picturing a pierced bowl with tines on the end or one side. How many tines, and what shape is the bowl? Could it possibly be a cucumber or tomato server?

One of the other major replacement services will also fabricate "relish scoops," "cheese servers," and "condiment ladles" from teaspoons. All are ugly as sin, with too shiny surfaces and awkward proportions.

IP: Logged

carlaz

Posts: 239
Registered: Jan 2001

iconnumber posted 08-16-2005 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for carlaz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The corn fork was pictured in the 1914 Gorham Chantilly catalog (reprint)on page 412. There is also an image of the corn fork in the Ostenberg's book "Yesterdays Silver for Today's Table" on page 188. It is a three tined fork that is pierced (4 piercings) and the fork has two smaller points in between the tines. It is said to measure somewhere between 6 1/2" and 6 3/4". Please note that in the Ostenberg book, the corn fork in not identified on that page specifically but it is the 7th fork in from the left.

------------------
CarlaZ

IP: Logged

doc

Posts: 701
Registered: Jul 2003

iconnumber posted 08-16-2005 02:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for doc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Here is a photo of a Chantilly corn fork. Based on the design, my guess is that it may have been poked into the end of a cob of corn to hold the corn, similar to corn picks today.

IP: Logged

wev
Moderator

Posts: 4046
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 08-16-2005 02:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for wev     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Which would seem to me a rather poor design, having more to do with marketing than common sense.

IP: Logged

carlaz

Posts: 239
Registered: Jan 2001

iconnumber posted 08-16-2005 04:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for carlaz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I actually think the fork was designed to be used to eat the corn once it is off the cob. The shortened tines and decorated and pierced bowl would allow one dine on corn in an elegant yet constructive manner.

Just a thought!

IP: Logged

Marc

Posts: 414
Registered: Jun 2002

iconnumber posted 08-17-2005 01:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi guys,

I remember the corn fork I sold a few years ago had a later patent date on it than the "1895" date on most chantilly.. I was astonished when it sold for $500. But it did go to a collector, so it was right.

Hope this helps..

Thanks.

Marc

IP: Logged

Ulysses Dietz
Moderator

Posts: 1265
Registered: May 99

iconnumber posted 08-17-2005 10:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ulysses Dietz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Corn on the cob was not considered a genteel food, and therefore beyond the pale of silver users, although it hit a certain fashionability at the end of the 19th century for casual dining. The reason there are no antique silver corn picks is that nice people just didn't eat it -- yet. Corn kernels present the same sort of problem that peas do; how to keep them on a fork? The corn fork as seen here would probably have suited peas equally well: the victorian marketing director's brilliant idea on another way to sell more silver!

IP: Logged

Paul Lemieux

Posts: 1755
Registered: Apr 2000

iconnumber posted 08-17-2005 12:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul Lemieux     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think the earliest corn picks I have seen are early 20th century. They are steel picks with figural hollow sterling corn cob handles. I think we have all seen them. A magazine article or book identified some Shiebler Homeric two-tined forks as corn picks, but I really think they are berry forks.

Marc, I am curious, what date did your Chantilly corn fork have? I have never seen Chantilly with a patent date other than 1895.

IP: Logged

Richard Kurtzman
Moderator

Posts: 755
Registered: Aug 2000

iconnumber posted 08-18-2005 05:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Richard Kurtzman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi Guys, I have to disagree with you on the time frame for the advent of corn picks or corn holders. I believe that they date to at least the 1880s. Look at page 305 in the fourth edition of Rainwater and you will see pictured a set of six all sterling Shiebler medallion holders. I have also had an all sterling set by Mauser in the same shape with ears of corn forming the flat handles. In regard to the more common form with steel picks, I remember seeing them pictured in one of my 1890s catalogs. If I can retrieve it I will post it.

IP: Logged

Ulysses Dietz
Moderator

Posts: 1265
Registered: May 99

iconnumber posted 08-19-2005 03:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ulysses Dietz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd love to see that posted--because it makes sense. Corn picks or holders would be the ideal solution to the embarrassing physicality of eating corn on the cob...so logically they should have been invented in the 1880s...when middle-class people first tried to figure out how to eat it without disgracing themselves.

IP: Logged

wev
Moderator

Posts: 4046
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 08-19-2005 04:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for wev     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just happened upon this patent for a corn spoon:

Considering what havoc could be wrought if you weren't paying attention while taking a mouthful, I doubt this was a big seller.

IP: Logged

dragonflywink

Posts: 953
Registered: Dec 2002

iconnumber posted 10-28-2007 05:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dragonflywink     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
1878 patent for an Implement for Holding Hot Corn:

IP: Logged

All times are ET

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.46a


1. Public Silver Forums (open Free membership) - anyone with a valid e-mail address may register. Once you have received your Silver Salon Forum password, and then if you abide by the Silver Salon Forum Guidelines, you may start a thread or post a reply in the New Members' Forum. New Members who show a continued willingness to participate, to completely read and abide by the Guidelines will be allowed to post to the Member Public Forums.
Click here to Register for a Free password

2. Private Silver Salon Forums (invitational or $ donation membership) - The Private Silver Salon Forums require registration and special authorization to view, search, start a thread or to post a reply. Special authorization can be obtained in one of several ways: by Invitation; Annual $ Donation; or via Special Limited Membership. For more details click here (under development).

3. Administrative/Special Private Forums (special membership required) - These forums are reserved for special subjects or administrative discussion. These forums are not open to the public and require special authorization to view or post.


| Home | Order | The Guide to Evaluating Gold & Silver Objects | The Book of Silver
| Update BOS Registration | Silver Library | For Sale | Our Wants List | Silver Dealers | Speakers Bureau |
| Silversmiths | How to set a table | Shows | SMP | Silver News |
copyright © 1993 - 2019 SM Publications
All Rights Reserved.
Legal & Privacy Notices