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Author Topic:   Whiting bunny ladle--image test
Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 05-25-2014 12:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
To test the new image hosting service, I'll try to post photos of my new little Whiting ladle with a rabbit on the handle:


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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 05-25-2014 12:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes! It seems to have worked. Here are the other photos:

Ladle with almonds, to show scale:

And two close-ups of the bunny:

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wev
Moderator

Posts: 4095
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 05-25-2014 12:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for wev     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Very nice

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 05-25-2014 12:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, wev !

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Scott Martin
Forum Master

Posts: 11377
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 05-25-2014 01:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Very nice.

smile Make the ears smaller, add a long tail, some beady-eyes and I think it will match the mouse on one of our Whiting cheese scoops (in deep storage). wink

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 05-25-2014 08:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Scott! Hey, why did I post this in the coin silver forum instead of the American sterling forum? Silly me!! It's sterling. Sorry about that.

There's a Gorham shell-shaped cheese dish with a mouse sniffing from the rim that's on my list of Things to Buy When I Win the Lottery...

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 05-25-2014 08:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
moved

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 01-11-2015 02:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I recently got a friend for the bunny ladle: a bird spoon. It's marked only STERLING and 7, but it's clearly by Whiting too.



[This message has been edited by Polly (edited 01-12-2015).]

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 01-11-2015 02:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here are the bird and the bunny hanging out together:


Is there anything anyone can tell me about this pattern? I've seen servers (ladles and various spoon-y things) with the same arrangement of three stalks, those round doodads, and various stuff at the end, such as 3D birds like mine, Whiting's "bird's nest" pattern, and 3D flowers. Has anyone seen any other animals? Thoughts about when these were made? Or any other thoughts?

[This message has been edited by Polly (edited 01-12-2015).]

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 01-11-2015 02:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm drawn to these patterns that have thin stalk-like handles accentuated by little disks, vine-y or leaf-y tendrils, and animals or balls at the ends. I seem to have accumulated a number of them. Any thoughts about who came up with this general design idea, when?

Left to right, here are two Gorham citrus spoons (or something like that); the Whiting bird serving spoon; the Whiting rabbit sauce ladle; a George Sharp punch or soup ladle with a hexagonal, notched handle and a gothic ball end; a George Sharp fork with a hexagonal handle and a ball end (somewhere I have the matching spoon); a squirrel nutpick with a hexagonal handle, probably also Sharp; an unmarked mustard or master salt spoon in the same pattern as that ball-end fork; and a Wood & Hughes teaspoon:

[This message has been edited by Polly (edited 01-11-2015).]

[This message has been edited by Polly (edited 01-12-2015).]

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asheland

Posts: 925
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 01-11-2015 10:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I love that group!
I seriously like that figural silver from that period! I have a salt cellar coming that is Saxon Stag pattern by Gorham, can't wait to see it in person...

The Bunny ladle, from what I understand is Whiting, but I'm not (certain)

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 01-12-2015 01:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ooops!!! I meant Whiting and typed Gorham throughout!! Apologies and thanks, Asheland. I'm going to go edit that to correct it.

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asheland

Posts: 925
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 01-12-2015 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's all good!
:-)

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agleopar

Posts: 847
Registered: Jun 2004

iconnumber posted 01-12-2015 11:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for agleopar     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Polly as a silversmith I love these little treasures both for the historical and art. Not only that, they are made technically brilliantly such that 100+ years on they are still useable and sound.
Some may say these are a modest showing of that age but though small they show all the bells and whistles of the silversmiths art from modeling, casting, die striking, engraving, chasing, polishing, gilding and acid etching to name the techniques that can be in just one of these.

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asheland

Posts: 925
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 01-12-2015 01:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Indeed the skills to make these items are impressive!
Gorham and Tiffany made such wonderful items during that period!

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 01-12-2015 02:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you, Rob & Asheland.

The citrus spoons ARE in fact by Gorham--they have the lion, anchor, g on the back. But the rest of the ones I called Gorham are actually by Whiting.

I love the way so many different American silver makers made objects like these, with subtle differences. They started around 1870, right? And they stopped by the mid or late 1870s? Or did this style go on longer?

The Sharp ones have solid balls on the ends, which makes them unbalanced--the fork is always crashing off the side of the plate, and I imagine you might get mustard on your tablecloth if you weren't careful with the mustard spoon. (Yes, I know, the mustard was a dry powder at the time. But I bet it still would make a mess.) In contrast, the W&H spoon's end is hollow and it's perfectly balanced. It's one of my very favorite spoons to use.

I was the only person bidding on the bird spoon, so I got it for (relatively) cheap. I wonder why nobody else wanted it. Are fashions changing? Or maybe I was just lucky.

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agleopar

Posts: 847
Registered: Jun 2004

iconnumber posted 01-12-2015 03:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for agleopar     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was the only person bidding on the bird spoon, so I got it for (relatively) cheap. I wonder why nobody else wanted it. Are fashions changing? Or maybe I was just lucky.

I think that you and three others are now ahead of the curve and when your collections get noticed and the fashion for hacking and steampunk die then nature and beauty will bounce back. Isn't Rococo also due for its third or fourth revival, a la Shiebler Rococo?

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 01-12-2015 04:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's funny about Rococo. Did you see the Rococo exhibition at the Cooper Hewitt Museum in 2008? It completely blew my mind. I'd always had a sort of shuddering "Ick! Ew!" reaction to Rococo, but that exhibit completely changed how I saw it in the context of its later history and even how I felt about the Rococo curves and motifs themselves.

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/exhibitions/35350903/

When was the last time Rococo was revived? Sort of the 1960s, right? And before that, in the Beaux Arts period when Shiebler Rococo was popular, and before that, in the 1850s. That Cooper Hewitt exhibition made the argument that Art Nouveau was a form of, or maybe a child of, Rococo, and Art Nouveau had a big revival in the 1970s. I always liked Art Nouveau much better than Rococo, myself, but I can see how they're related: curves & highly stylized organic forms.

Steampunk seems to be mostly about a not-especially-history-based nostalgia for the era just before World War I and its machinery. I guess it's missing the organic forms of Rococo and Art Nouveau. But I'm not sure steampunk is the dominant design force right now. I would say the dominant taste is for mid-century modernism and minimalism, the simplicity end of the simplicity-complexity continuum.

Of course, there have always been people who prefer simplicity and people who prefer complexity, even when their taste goes against the general fashion. But fashion does tend to swing back and forth between those two poles.

I'm not sure where these particular pieces (I mean the style of silver in this thread) fall on the simplicity/complexity continuum, though. They're way simpler than lots of 19th century stuff, for example.

There's also the realism-stylization axis. These spoons etc. seem more realistic and less stylized, at least the bird and the bunny do.

Among our tiny little group of silver buffs, it seems like aesthetic stuff has been popular for a while, so I would have expected more bidding on this spoon. But I do think we're out of step with the current taste of the general population, which might find my spoons too fussy. (Still, I bought the bird spoon for a small fraction of what I've seen similar items sell for.)

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agleopar

Posts: 847
Registered: Jun 2004

iconnumber posted 01-12-2015 11:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for agleopar     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes I saw the Cooper Hewitt Rococo exhibit mostly to see the Meissonnier Tureen which was researched and restored by Ubaldo Vitali, Americas greatest silversmith. He also beautifully made a replacement liner for it. This has to be my favorite all time work!
I love the way you have " graphed" the continuum and axis of simplicity/complexity - realism/stylization and yes I agree that style swings between these poles. It seems that it goes from generation to generation in reaction to the last generations excesses. When the world gets soaked in curves let's get straight lines!
Changes in the pre industrial world if you go by spoons came roughly at the rate of every 15 years. That is a gross generalization but think rat tail, drop, tip, sharp shoulders, soft shoulders, coffin top, fiddle, double swell, etc.... Then came steam and the changes seem to have only sped up.
It is my luck that we are in that simplicity phase when I'd love to be doing Rococo... I'm not sure I will live long enough to ride that wave when it does come back! Maybe I should lead the charge - does anyone out there want a tureen??

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 01-12-2015 11:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I do want a tureen! But first I need my lottery winnings to pay for it.

Aren't there any Brooklyn hipster "makers" clamoring to apprentice with you? You could start a new movement AND change taste.

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 11-19-2015 02:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My new Whiting spoon in this style, this one with a 3D cattail handle:




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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 11-19-2015 02:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
At least, I assume it's Whiting; it's unmarked except for STERLING and 8, as shown. It's about 10 inches long, significantly bigger than my bird and bunny.

[This message has been edited by Polly (edited 11-19-2015).]

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 11-19-2015 02:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
(And I see the photo came out HUGE. Sorry about that. You'd think I'd have a handle on image sizes after all these years, but no.)

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Scott Martin
Forum Master

Posts: 11377
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 11-19-2015 02:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The photo size is fine. I suspect your Whiting suspicion is very probable.

Thanks for sharing.

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asheland

Posts: 925
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 11-20-2015 09:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Awesome piece, Polly! I love all of that Aesthetic period silver! smile

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 11-20-2015 03:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you, Scott & Asheland!

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