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tline3open  William Waldo Dodge

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Author Topic:   William Waldo Dodge
FredZ

Posts: 1069
Registered: Jun 99

iconnumber posted 05-25-2005 03:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FredZ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I started this thread to show images of Dodge items and some of his marks.

These appear on the pair of buckles I just bought. The bottom image show the scratched inventory numbers. 4 for the forth month. A triangle for the mark signifying that it was made by Ray Yeomans in 1933 and the last set of numbers indicate the sequence of items he made that month. Note the error and correction. I think the arrow is a nice touch.....

I will post more later.

Fred


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asheland

Posts: 856
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 10-11-2009 03:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Here is the old Dodge shop in Biltmore Forest.

Taken about a year ago. It still looks quite nice. I believe it's vacant right now.

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doc

Posts: 701
Registered: Jul 2003

iconnumber posted 10-11-2009 03:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for doc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Marks from a Dodge trophy bowl.

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asheland

Posts: 856
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 10-11-2009 07:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nice marks, doc. Do you have any pictures of the bowl or any of the engraving?

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bascall

Posts: 1621
Registered: Nov 99

iconnumber posted 10-11-2009 08:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great set of marks. Seeing the entire piece would be a treat!

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doc

Posts: 701
Registered: Jul 2003

iconnumber posted 10-12-2009 09:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for doc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Happy to oblige. The bowl is a trophy for the 1930 all around shooting champion for the Maine chapter of the American Trapshooting Association. I have seen a couple of other examples of Dodge trophies from ATA chapters, so he must have had a contract with them.

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bascall

Posts: 1621
Registered: Nov 99

iconnumber posted 10-12-2009 10:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What a beautiful bowl. It looks like it would be a much more elegant prize than a loving cup sort of trophy.

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asheland

Posts: 856
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 10-13-2009 01:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great piece doc! Do you have the book about Dodge by Bruce Johnson? If not, I highly recommend it!

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doc

Posts: 701
Registered: Jul 2003

iconnumber posted 10-13-2009 03:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for doc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't have Bruce Johnson's book, but I have spoken with him. The bowl was one of those great out of the way auction finds in Maine-I didn't know the maker when I bid on it, but the marks alone told me it was worth buying.

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asheland

Posts: 856
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 07-26-2016 10:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just received a pair of the buckles similar to Fred's. They even have similar scratched coding on them. smile

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Scott Martin
Forum Master

Posts: 11202
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 07-26-2016 10:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That is great!

Finding smalls by Dodge can be difficult.

I'm so glad it is in the hands of someone who appreciates it! smile

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asheland

Posts: 856
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 07-26-2016 10:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you Scott! I am very happy to have found them indeed! I'll post pictures of them when I am able.

In the meantime, here's a picture of the Dodge shop that I took about 2 or 3 months ago:

I have to pass through the Biltmore Forest area every day, so going to the Dodge shop is very easy. It's in terrific shape as can be seen in this picture!

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Scott Martin
Forum Master

Posts: 11202
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 07-26-2016 10:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
An interesting Dodge bio:
    Architects and Builders in North Carolina
    Dodge, William Waldo, Jr. (1895-1971)
    quote:
    William Waldo Dodge, Jr. (1895-1971), architect and craftsman, was one of the leading figures in Asheville's architectural scene as well as an illustrious and well-known silversmith. He was part of an important larger movement in Asheville that expressed the influences of the romantic and Arts and Crafts movements in a variety of media from architecture to silver, pottery, weaving, and other arts. His personalized work attracted liberal patronage, even during the Great Depression, from clients who could still afford to build, and his buildings remain treasured expressions of his craftsmanly approach to architecture.

    Dodge was born in Washington, D. C. in 1895, the son of William W. and Margaret Parker Dodge. His father was a patent attorney who headed a successful family legal practice in the nation's capital. William, Jr., attended the Friends School in Washington and then Philips-Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. He was sent to Princeton University to prepare for a career in law, but after a year decided that he did not want to be an attorney and enrolled at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to study architecture. He was graduated from MIT with a Bachelor of Architecture in 1916. From Cambridge, with World War I looming, he went to Plattsburg, New York, and enrolled in officer's training school. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant and sent to France as a member of the American Expeditionary Force. Wounded in battle, he was awarded a Silver Star and Purple Heart.

    Exposure to chlorine gas during the war aggravated Dodge's tubercular condition, and after the war, he was treated at the veterans' hospital at Oteen near Asheville, North Carolina, a community long regarded as having a climate and surroundings beneficial to patients afflicted with lung diseases. This assignment brought Dodge to the Asheville area, where he spent most of the rest of his life. At Oteen he taught crafts to fellow patients and developed an interest in silver and copper smithing. After he was released from the hospital, Dodge moved to Connecticut and married Margaret Robinson, but a relapse forced him to enter Gaylord Tuberculosis Sanitorium. While he was convalescing there, the Dodges studied silversmithing. After his discharge, the couple moved to Asheville, where Dodge briefly taught physics and mechanical drawing at the Asheville Boys School. He opened a silversmith shop on Charlotte Street in Asheville and created over the years a unique and widely admired body of artistic silver work.

    Early in the 1920s, a prominent Asheville citizen asked Dodge to design a residence for him, and Dodge planned for him the lavish Tudor Revival style Hammond-Knowlton House (1925). Drawing upon his training at MIT, Dodd added architectural practice to his silversmith's craft. With Asheville in the midst of a boom period, he found abundant opportunities and in 1927 moved to a shop he designed and built in the new suburban community of Biltmore Forest, developed on a portion of the Biltmore Estate. An account of Dodge's practice was published in the American Architect in November, 1928, illustrating his silverware, workshop, and studio, and describing him as "an architect by profession and a craftsman by avocation." In 1929 Dodge obtained a license to practice architecture in North Carolina, and he continued to attract or find commissions during the Great Depression.

    Blending English, French, and rustic elements already favored in the mountain city, where the mountain setting and the romantic (and French) aura of Biltmore exerted strong influences, Dodge rendered these themes in picturesque compositions enriched with handcrafted detailing that appealed to the wealthy residents of Asheville and Biltmore Forest. His own shop and other small buildings—including repurposed log cabins from the region—display his intricately crafted details and rustic motifs on a modest scale, while larger houses such as the William A. Knight House II in Biltmore Forest combine brick, stucco, stone, and wood, and individually designed details of wood carvings, hinges, sculptures, and more to evoke the spirit of a French chateau.

    In 1942, facing the wartime hiatus in private construction, he and five other western North Carolina architects banded together to form the architectural firm of Six Associates to enable them to compete for defense contracts and other large projects. Although the firm continued and expanded after the war, in 1947 Dodge withdrew to resume his own practice, which he pursued until his retirement in 1956. His son William Waldo Dodge, III, followed him in the profession with a large practice in Raleigh.

    Note: A large collection entitled the William Waldo Dodge Architectural Drawings, 1916-1989 (MC 00372) was donated in 2010 to the Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries. Although most of the drawings are from the firm of Dodge III, there are several by Dodge, Jr., especially from the post-World War II period. When processing is complete and further field checking can be done, additional entries will be inserted in the building list.

    Authors: Charlotte V. Brown and Zoe Rhine. Update: Catherine W. Bishir.

    Published 2012


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asheland

Posts: 856
Registered: Nov 2003

iconnumber posted 07-26-2016 10:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for asheland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here they are:




smile

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