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tlineopen  American Silver before sterling
tline3open  c. 1735 Adrian Bancker coin silver spoon

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Author Topic:   c. 1735 Adrian Bancker coin silver spoon
Scott Martin
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Posts: 11377
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iconnumber posted 08-05-1999 11:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I thought you might find this interesting:

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FredZ

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iconnumber posted 08-06-1999 09:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FredZ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Scott the spoon is wonderful.... is this an offer to sell or just a tease.... All kiding aside it is a fine example of an early 18th century rat tail american spoon... Hanovarian style. I do not have my books handy but the mark looks familiar. We will identify it for you shortly and if it is for sale... I am definately interested in it. Thanks for the image and what camera are you using for the images?

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wev
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iconnumber posted 08-06-1999 07:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for wev     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A handsome spoon, indeed. The maker is Adrian Bancker (1703-1772) of New York. He learned his trade as apprentice to Henricus Boelen c 1718 and was made a freeman in 1731. The spoon was made around this time, just as he was hitting his stride as a silversmith. It is a transitional piece, showing the gradual adoption of new forms. While it retains the full elliptical bowl and long rattail drop common at the beginning of the century, it has a handle in the Hanover style, with an upturned end and a long front mid-rib, a design introduced in England two decades earlier. Another Bancker spoon made a few years earlier is shown in Belton on page 478/479 and it makes an interesting comparison. The bowl and rattail are nearly identical, but the handle is of early form: it joins the bowl at nearly a right angle with little or no arch, the stem is a flat rectangle in cross-section with a wide waist. The sides are parallel for 2/3 its length before flaring out quickly to a dog-nose end. By contrast, the handle seen here shows the beginnings of the flat bottom/round top cross-section, pinched-in and arched waist, and more gradual flaring out to the end that will become fully developed in the graceful forms of the 1770s. Thank you very much for posting such an interesting example of colonial silver.

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Scott Martin
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Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 08-07-1999 12:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
FredZ -

I have several different camera setups.
For this I just used my old Sony Mavica for a few quick snapshots.

Wm. & Ted -

Thanks for your insights. Do you have any other pieces that we could use to do a comparison to demonstrate the diferences in rattail design?

Scott

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swarter
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iconnumber posted 05-25-2003 05:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for swarter     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I noticed no further response had been provided to the last query, and thought the following would be of interest:

The three spoons pictured here show an interesting progression in form (althougah they are not chronological)in which the full rattail is first truncated, then further shortened to a vestigal rattail, without being otherwise altered in shape or size, thus leading to the later more modified drops that followed on later hanoverian styles.

The first spoon is by Jonathan Clarke (1706-66), the second by Jacob Gerritze Lansing (1681-1767), and the third, another by Adrian Bancker (1703-72). Interestingly the stem of this Bancker handle is earlier in form than the one with the full rattail (posted earlier by Scott), being both wider and flatter. The Bancker spoon with the full rattail is more like the Clarke spoon. The shape of the stem of the Lansing spoon is narrower and thicker, the handle with a more pronounced ridge, and is of a form often seen on Hanoverians after the rattails disappeared; it is the latest of the group.

Even the early smiths were not above experimenting, and often abandoned orthodoxy in style by combining features of differing styles.

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swarter
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iconnumber posted 03-18-2005 02:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for swarter     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have come across a forgotten (by me) article by Charlotte Wilcoxen (Antiques Magazine October 1982, pp. 796-799) which reassignd the mark on the spoon identified above as by Jacob Gerritse Lansing (1891 - 1767). The above mark, a barred IL (the I with a cross stroke) and another plain IL are now assigned to the elder Jacob's second son, Jacob Jacobse Lansing (1714 - 1791), also known as Jacob Lansing, Jr. Heretofore the first mark had been assigned to the elder Lansing, and the second one to the elder Lansing's grandson, also named Jacob Gerritse Lansing (1737 - 1803). Jacob, Jr. had not previously been known to be a silversmith. Both Grandfather and grandson used only marks reading IGL; assignment of the IL marks to either or both was inconsistent with their use of the three-letter marks.

Jacob, Jr. was both uncle and father-in-law of the younger Jacob Gerritse Lansing. Further genealogical and biographical information on the son is to be found in the magazine article; on the grandfather and grandson in Norman Rice's Albany Silver (1964).

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Ulysses Dietz
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iconnumber posted 04-16-2005 01:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ulysses Dietz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just putting in some curatorial notes: We have an Adrian Bancker spoon that belonged to the Bordens who founded Bordentown, NJ. It is of just this sort, dating from the 1720s or so. We also have a spoon from the same couple, presumably given as part of a set at their marriage in 1715. This one is by another Dutch/Huguenot silversmith, Johannes Nys, of Philadelphia. We also have a set of tablespoons by Henricus Boelen with a New Jersey history.

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Ulysses Dietz
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iconnumber posted 04-19-2005 10:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ulysses Dietz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here are the Museum's spoons--Johannes Nys with the rattail, and Adrian Bancker with the shell swage mark.

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swarter
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iconnumber posted 04-20-2005 12:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for swarter     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With Ulysses Dietz' kind permission, I have put the images of his museum's spoons into an arrangement to facilitate comparison with the others in this thread. The Bancker is on the left, the Nys on the right. It is interesting to see the variety of styles in which Bancker worked during his career.

I have also placed these images into the series in the Besly thread (Traveling silversmith, well-traveled spoon) for proportional comparison.

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