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Author Topic:   bearded Baltimore cream pot
akgdc
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iconnumber posted 01-08-2004 08:56 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's a cream pot that I bought a year or so ago that's a bit of a puzzle. It's clearly 1850s and reminiscent of some New York pieces I've seen, except for the unusual spout in the form of a bearded man's face. (You might end up with a few whiskers in your tea.) But the mark is one I haven't found published anywhere: "WARRINER & SEMKEN" with the "10-15" standard mark indicative of Baltimore coin silver.

I've found a Henry Semken listed as a jeweller in Baltimore directories of the 1850s. And a coin silver creamer and sugar (of a different design than this) marked "H. SEMKEN" sold last year at an auction in Washington, DC. (The catalogue gave no indication of maker or place.) Not a trace of any Warriner, though.

Interestingly, the bearded man motif, sometimes referred to as a "Turk's head," is one found on Baltimore classical furniture. For instance, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation has a Baltimore sideboard dated 1815-1830 with very similar heads on it.

Has anyone in these forums ever seen the "WARRINER & SEMKEN" mark, either in print or in the flesh? And any thoughts as to whether this was a maker or just a retailer?

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swarter
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Registered: May 2003

iconnumber posted 01-09-2004 01:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for swarter     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There is a reference to a Chauncey Warriner (no date given) of Washington, DC in the horological literature. Perhaps there was a short undocumented partnership with Henry Simkin.

Certainly the 10.15 mark is indicative of a Baltimore origin, but the mark does sometimes appears on silver sold elsewhere, either on imported Baltimore silver or possibly made by ex-Baltimore silversmiths adhering to the Baltimore standard. There was a Louisville, KY silversmith, S.W.Warriner, who at one time roomed with another Louisville silversmith, Jonathan Simpson -- if the latter were a misspelling of Semkin by a census taker who "heard it wrong" (a not uncommon occurence), these could be the sellers, as the 10.15 mark occurs on other Kentucky marked silver.

An interesting piece, nonetheless, and a nice find.

[This message has been edited by swarter (edited 01-09-2004).]

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 12-13-2008 04:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sylvester Wilson Warriner looked like he had possibilities briefly. However, I have to go along with swarter's suggestion for Chauncey Warriner and Henry (Sempken) Semken as the attribution for the mark in question.

Judging by the ages and places of birth of Chauncey Warriner's children and his listing in the 1860 U S Federal Census for Washington D C, Chauncey Warriner was in Washington D C from at least 1855 until about 1863. After that time he appears to have spent the remainder of his career working as a jeweler in Fryeburg, Maine.

Chauncey was born in Vermont in about 1813.
Henry Semken was born in Germany in about 1825.

Yes, it is a great piece and an interesting face.

[This message has been edited by bascall (edited 12-13-2008).]

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 12-13-2008 04:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Additional information just found online, and I can at least confirm that Chauncey's wife's name was Abby from the census's: Sept._, 1854 An Intention of Marriage between Mr. Chauncey Warriner of Washington, D.C. and Miss Abby Towle of Fryeburg has been left in the Town Clerk's office. Cert. granted.


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bascall

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iconnumber posted 12-13-2008 05:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And then of course the Abby Towle name sounded familiar, so I checked wev's American family tree listings, and there's the run down on Chauncey Warriner. Oh well, it's always eductational going through the "drill" anyway.

[This message has been edited by bascall (edited 12-13-2008).]

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Fitzhugh

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iconnumber posted 07-18-2016 11:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fitzhugh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
FYI, John Simpson, as referenced in the 1850 Louisville, Jefferson County, KY Federal Census, is John Simpson Jr., son of Jonathan Simpson the better known Bardstown, Nelson County, KY silversmith. SW Warriner was born in Massachusetts ca. 1818.

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Fitzhugh

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iconnumber posted 08-13-2018 07:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fitzhugh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just today encountered an equally well repousse' piece by Sylvester Warriner. Are these two Warriners related?

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Scott Martin
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iconnumber posted 08-13-2018 07:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Please show us so we can decide? smile

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Fitzhugh

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Registered: Jan 2002

iconnumber posted 08-13-2018 09:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fitzhugh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Per the genealogies, Sylvester & Chauncey Warriner have a shared lineage.---OLD WASHINGTON (Drinks & Businesses)
By James Croggon, The Evening Star, August 14, 1910 [p. 10] "In the forties Messrs. Galt, Keyworth and Massi, watchmakers and jewelers, were at their old stands, and in this decade, Samuel Lewis was a leading silversmith on the south side of the avenue between 10th and 11th streets, and afterward moved to the north side between 12th and 13th streets. Near the latter place was J. Montandon, who was succeeded by C. Lesiardi. Chauncey Warriner was on the north side of the avenue between 2d and 3d, and after near Brown's Hotel. Mr. S. Masi had a second establishment near the corner of 4-1/2 street and the Avenue. On the south side of the Avenue between 12th and 13th streets was John Reese. William Voss long kept opposite a well known watchmaking and jewelry establishment. On 7th street at the corner of H was Joseph Marsoletti, who was better known in the musical world, at one time being the leader of one of the best bands of the day, that of the Washington Light Infantry. Joseph Huggins was then on the south side of F street between 12th and 13th as watchmaker, and later on the Avenue near 11th street. On the Avenue between 4-1/2 and 6th streets was C.W. Heydon & Co. and S. Eddy."

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Fitzhugh

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Registered: Jan 2002

iconnumber posted 08-13-2018 09:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fitzhugh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
THE WASHINGTON AND GEORGETOWN DIRECTORY, STRANGERS' GUIDE-BOOK FOR WASHINGTON, 1853, p. 109: C. WARRINER & CO.; C. Warriner; H. Semkin; Wholesale and retail dealers in Watches, Jewelry, Silverware, & Fancy Goods, Penna. Ave., between 9th & 10th Streets, Washington D. C.

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