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tline3open  1850's Mystery Pattern

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Author Topic:   1850's Mystery Pattern
Bob Schulhof

Posts: 194
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 04-25-1999 06:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob Schulhof     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A Mystery Pattern (1850?)

Special Features

The American silver makers would not long be constrained by tradition and unique patterns would appear by the 1850's. This is one of my favorites although no one knows it's name or even the manufacturer. There are no makers marks on these just various retailers marks. I wrote Don Soeffing about the pattern. He said it was one of his favorites too, and speculated that it was made by Philo Gilbert. This pattern was made in a very complete line and I have seen large serving pieces as well as smaller bon-bons and sugar shells. It was very widely distributed, the retailers vary from “Jaccard St. Louis” to A. Voorhees in New Jersey, Hoard & Avery in Chicago, M.W. Galt & Bros. Wash. D.C. All these are listed in Kovels Silver Marks, without reference to whether they were retailers or makers. Galt is referred to in Rainwater as a manufacturer, as is Jaccard. Whether this pattern was produced by one or more of the above or by another manufacturer for retail is the mystery. The tablespoon has no retailers marks, but a small “E” at the base of the spoon. I once saw a piece that appeared to have English hallmarks.

Dating

There are no sterling marks or coin marks, thus it is assumed these are coin or the equivalent. The retailers marks as well as the style indicate a date of 1850. Kovel gives : Jaccard & Co. 1830-1860, Voorhees c. 1840, Hoard & Avery 1856-1858 and Galt & Bro 1847-1879.

Pieces Available- (Shown )

Item length Our cost
Dinner Fork 7 7/8” $32
Luncheon Fork 6 7/8, $2 (no kidding, not a typo)
Tablespoon 8 ½” $45
Dessert Spoon 7 1/8" $30
Teaspoon 5 7/8” $10

Photo:

Reverse, showing marks (or lack of). Note the reverse pattern is complete like the front.

Key Pieces

Who knows? Is there a pastry, salad or fish fork? A coffee spoon?

Comments

Since no one knows what this pattern is, and the pieces they say neither "coin" nor "Sterling" I have bought some for as low as $2 each in a junk box for silver plate. There are dozens of patterns like these that we don't know the name of today. Someone needs to put them all in a book and give them a number to help collectors at least communicate. But this is the charm of collecting silver of the mid 1850's, you are constantly making undocumented discoveries.

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Bob Schulhof

Posts: 194
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 07-11-1999 07:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob Schulhof     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We still don't know who made this pattern, but we do know there is a pastry fork. I just picked one up at the Anaheim silver show for $20 (marked $25).

It is marked Squire & Lander which Kovel says is a circa 1840 firm in NY giving credence again to the 1840-1850 dating.

At this point I doubt that a small coffee spoon exists, nor a flat butter or dinner knife so I will pronounce this pattern complete, after three years of hunting.

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wev
Moderator

Posts: 4095
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 07-11-1999 08:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for wev     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I bought a sugar shell in this pattern out of a huge box of misc flatware at the Salvation Army about a month ago. (It was all I found, but at $1.50, I shouldn't complain.) It is marked J. Cook incuse, which I assumed was a retailer. Good to see you at the show, Bob.

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wev
Moderator

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Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 07-23-1999 07:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for wev     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just back from an 'estate' sale were I had to pay $3 for the ugliest pink pottery sugar bowl you have ever seen. The reason for this madness was the sugar spoon, which was actually a condiment ladle doing double duty. It is in the mystery pattern and the form is not entirely successful -- the neck is quite thick and the bowl too small in relation to the formed handle. It is marked in cartouche "M. D. BARNES" for Moses D. Barnes (d 1858)of Macon, Georgia. He advertised as a watchmaker and jeweler from his shop on Cotton Avenue in 1842. In addition, he offered dental supplies, (gold foil and teeth) and articles of silver 'made to the highest quality'. It is hard to say from this if he actually manufactured or simply retailed bought-in items, but this is the first example of this pattern I have seen with a cartouche mark or from a Southern locale.

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Bob Schulhof

Posts: 194
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 07-23-1999 07:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob Schulhof     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the update

This pattern has now been spotted from New York to Missouri to Georgia and appears to be a very full set including servers. Maybe someday we will know who made it.

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Bob Schulhof

Posts: 194
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 04-14-2000 11:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob Schulhof     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There is a lively discussion on this pattern in the Coin Silver Forum. Two new important pieces have been sighted, the first one, a butter knife sold by Ted Stickney , has the early hallmarks of Philo Gilbert who was not prone to put his hallmarks on other people's silver.

The second, a luncheon set on ebay bears the marks of John Cook who is said to have purchased Gilbert's dies after he went bankrupt in about 1868. Cook was in business until 1880. Therefore it is likely that the pattern was produced by Gilbert and marketed through many retailers in the period 1850-1868 and then by Cook until as late as 1880. Shiebler purchased Cook's dies but no pieces with Shiebler marks have been reported.

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Scott Martin
Forum Master

Posts: 11391
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 05-29-2000 03:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Found this weekend.

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wev
Moderator

Posts: 4095
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 05-31-2001 08:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for wev     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ran across this lovely pie server on ebay just before the close. High quality engraving. The seller does not mention it, but the pics are tagged "PhiloGilbert." Does anyone recognize the retailers mark?

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Bob Schulhof

Posts: 194
Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 02-23-2002 01:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob Schulhof     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's a great piece. Do you know what it sold for?

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Scott Martin
Forum Master

Posts: 11391
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 02-23-2002 10:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wev,

We rarely see serving pieces in this pattern. Very nice fish server.

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wev
Moderator

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Registered: Apr 99

iconnumber posted 02-23-2002 11:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for wev     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Refering to an auction ...

The slice and the pie server are the only large scale servers I have run across. Interesting that one is marked O. S. JENNINGS and the other JENNINGS & HART. Same Jennings? I presume they are retailers, but don't know them.

I did some checking; O. S. Jennings apears to be Oscar S. Jennings working alone as a silversmith, jeweler, and watchmaker in New York City, 1838-1847 and as a partner with Tobias Landers as JENNINGS & LANDERS, 1848-1851. Belden and Darling show his mark as incised; perhaps that seen here was used for retailed goods only. I find nothing on a JENNINGS & HART.

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bascall

Posts: 1626
Registered: Nov 99

iconnumber posted 04-20-2018 07:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

quote:
Originally posted by wev:
I find nothing on a JENNINGS & HART.



James Hervey Hart of Jennings & Hart 94 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, New York succeeded Tobias Landers.


|reg

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Trefid

Posts: 83
Registered: Nov 99

iconnumber posted 08-05-2020 04:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Trefid     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

I recently found this pair of ice tongs--quite heavy. I've gone along with Don Soeffing's attribution of the pattern, which someone on this forum named QUEEN OF THE SEA. I've seen his pseudos as well as "GILBERT" on various pieces.

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