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Author Topic:   Silver that is used daily
bascall

Posts: 1621
Registered: Nov 99

iconnumber posted 03-28-2008 04:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This may be a duplication of another thread, but a few simple searches did not turn up anything just like it. My favorite silver for daily use is coin silver forks. The full sized dinner type that are around eight inches long and usually at least two troy ounces. It doesn't matter who the maker is. They stay in the everyday silverware drawer for anyone to use. Silver for special occasions is a great idea, but what about the silver that is good for anytime. Any thoughts?

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rian

Posts: 169
Registered: Jan 2006

iconnumber posted 03-28-2008 08:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for rian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think I mentioned this in an earlier thread, but I keep a spooner with orphan teaspoons in different patterns on the divider. When guests have tea or coffee, I make a point of saying choose your favorite, to prevent them from just grabbing one without looking. Remembering who chooses what sometimes makes it easier on occasions when a small gift is required.

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 03-29-2008 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
rian, thank you for your reply! Hope nobody ever complains about getting a secondhand gift as we know too well it can happen. Here's my little group of every day forks:

The Falconer Bros. mark from the threaded fiddle pattern fork is the only mark that is not well documented. It took a good while to locate any reference to this mark. It was finally found in a Trow's New York City Directory for 1857 which lists a Peter R Falconer & Bro, watchmakers at 169 Greenwich. This is a tentative identification that may prove useful sometime. It always seems to me that anything that was produced in multiples is going to come up more than once.

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seaduck

Posts: 335
Registered: Dec 2006

iconnumber posted 03-29-2008 01:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for seaduck     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Do you hand wash your every-day silver or put it in the dishwasher?

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 03-29-2008 01:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Handwash. It's just part of the daily routine.

[This message has been edited by bascall (edited 03-29-2008).]

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doc

Posts: 701
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iconnumber posted 04-01-2008 07:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for doc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I like to pick up single sterling or coin serving spoons to use for dishing out veggies. My favorite is a Russian piece-the bowl is beat up, but it is perfect for dishing out peas or corn!

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rian

Posts: 169
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iconnumber posted 04-01-2008 08:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for rian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bascall, I really like the second fork from the bottom. I know several makers had a variation of that pattern. How is yours marked?

Doc, the more often I use a piece of silver the more fond of it I become. The imperfections just don't matter.

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 04-01-2008 09:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you rian and Doc for your input. The second fork from the bottom is marked from left to right with an "X," Patent 1855, Coin, and Platt & Bro NY.

Another silver item that comes in handy fairly often is a solid sterling silver shoe horn. It's pretty plain but larger than an ordinary shoe horn. The retailer is Black, Star and Frost. The trademark is unkown to me, so an image of the mark will be forthcoming soon.

[This message has been edited by bascall (edited 04-02-2008).]

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dragonflywink

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Registered: Dec 2002

iconnumber posted 04-01-2008 11:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dragonflywink     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I live by myself now, so I usually just use my mutant Viking Baby Christening set (picture huge helmet-wearing, fur-clad infants). There's a large bowled spoon and long-tined fork, each about 7" long, showing the Danish warrior-Queen Thyra, and both engraved "Baby 1913". Quite comfortable in the hand and sturdy (.826 silver), along with a good paring knife, the occasional butter knife and my own little assortment of "orphan spoons", plus my primitive antler handled steel fork for stabbing bits and pieces of fruits and vegetables - and I'm all set!

~Cheryl

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Paul Lemieux

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Registered: Apr 2000

iconnumber posted 04-02-2008 12:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul Lemieux     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have a couple Earl Pardon for Towle bar accessories that I use a lot, one is a muddler and one is a cheese knife/bottle opener. I often use a pair of Towle mid-century candlesticks. I always put a few pieces of gum in a Victorian silver pillbox that I keep in my bag. I used to use an old silver cigarette case to hold credit cards/IDs, but I lost it.

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 04-02-2008 12:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's the shoe horn with the trademark that is unknown to me. Any help with the identification would be very much appreciated.

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ahwt

Posts: 2022
Registered: Mar 2003

iconnumber posted 04-02-2008 07:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ahwt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I cannot make out the mark, but it does appear to resemble a G. If so Gorham had a connection with Black, Starr and Frost and perhaps they were the manufacturer.

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 04-02-2008 09:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks to all for your responses.

The Danish children's flatware are really very nice.


quote:
Originally posted by ahwt:
I cannot make out the mark

Your right! The mark is well worn and difficult to shoot much better. A few more trys are in order though because the mark definitely doesn't look like a "G."

[This message has been edited by bascall (edited 04-02-2008).]

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dragonflywink

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Registered: Dec 2002

iconnumber posted 04-02-2008 11:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dragonflywink     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Glad you like the Queen Thyra pieces, Bascall, I have a weakness for Scandinavian silver. Here's a serving spoon in a different Thyra pattern from around the same time period.

~Cheryl

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 04-03-2008 08:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
dragonflywink,

At least to my eye, you have some really exceptional Scandinavian flatware.

ahwt is probably right about the "G" mark on the shoe horn. Here is another attempt at an image of the mark:

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rian

Posts: 169
Registered: Jan 2006

iconnumber posted 04-03-2008 09:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for rian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Queen Thyra is awesome but my favorite of Cheryl's wonderful collection is the worried knight. I have no idea which thread he appeared in, but just the memory makes me smile....(find it here: Engravings with Personality)

Bascall, as you probably already know, even without the lion anchor g, your leaf fork must be Gorham's Josephine. Somewhere, I have a coin sugar spoon in an unidentified leaf. it's in a zip-loc labeled not Gorham not Shiebler not etc... If I can find it, I'll put in my sugar bowl and then it will fit in this thread.

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salmoned

Posts: 336
Registered: Jan 2005

iconnumber posted 04-03-2008 02:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for salmoned     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I thought 'D' or 'B' before, but with this new photo I feel fairly confident it's Blackletter capital 'N'.

[This message has been edited by salmoned (edited 04-03-2008).]

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FredZ

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Registered: Jun 99

iconnumber posted 04-03-2008 06:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FredZ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am a firm believer in using what I collect. I have a large Johnathan Otis spoon in superb condition that we use regularly as a serving spoon and I handwash only.

We also have several Arts & Crafts Movement spoons that are regualrly used for cereal or ice cream.

Fred

[This message has been edited by FredZ (edited 05-21-2008).]

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Polly

Posts: 1843
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 04-07-2008 02:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I love everyone's daily silver! Here's some of mine:

A pair of hairpins marked "sterling"; a Whiting twist handle paper knife (we use it as a letter opener), marked 8, the Whiting beastie, sterling, 1945; a shoehorn marked "H.W.Ld," with British hallmarks; a Duhme & co nutpick that I use as a bird-training tool:

And a selection of the teaspoons I use for my cereal, ice cream, etc--various 1870s patterns from Wood & Hughes, Gorham, etc (plus one fork marked sterling, Bailey & co):

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rian

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iconnumber posted 04-07-2008 04:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for rian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great spoons, Polly. Murillo, Milan, Angelo and Viola, right? The intricate patterns of the 1870s to early 80s are my favorites.

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 04-07-2008 04:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My choice would be the paper knife, but they're all great!

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 05-12-2008 02:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks to all for your replies on this topic. No doubt there is more to be said on this subject.

Thank you rian for the information about the Gorham Josephine piece. That was a nice surprise for me.

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Ulysses Dietz
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Registered: May 99

iconnumber posted 05-17-2008 12:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ulysses Dietz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is a fun idea. I tossed the stainless years ago, and now use a random assortment of sterling forks, both dinner and smaller. I try to quiz my kids and teach them what patterns there are (and why some forks are for me only!). But they just roll their eyes. The thought of matching flatware actually bothers me now.


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Polly

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iconnumber posted 05-18-2008 06:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nice forks, Ulysses! Did your children pick favorites before they started rolling their eyes?

I couldn't agree more about matching silver. Why limit yourself?

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ellabee

Posts: 306
Registered: Dec 2007

iconnumber posted 05-19-2008 10:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ellabee     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Maybe it's just me; I've never been very fond of the 1950s/early 1960s "starlite" designs, but they really stick out like sore thumbs in this company.

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ellabee

Posts: 306
Registered: Dec 2007

iconnumber posted 05-19-2008 11:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ellabee     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Gosh, I've just re-read that and it sounds so rude. Sorry. De gustibus non est disputandum.

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bascall

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iconnumber posted 05-19-2008 11:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not to contest anyones taste but simply to express my own, all the old forks are very much to my liking, and in the right setting the Diamond pattern fork, if that's what it is, would be very nice.

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Polly

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iconnumber posted 05-21-2008 09:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I love the contrast, myself.

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Ulysses Dietz
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iconnumber posted 05-26-2008 07:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ulysses Dietz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oh, I never get offended. Frankly, the modernist pieces amused me, because they are so period--but you know they've been published now...the curvy one is Wallace's Soliloquy with Dawn Mist surface texture (an option), published by Jewel Stern in her magnum opus for Dallas. The one with the snazzy angle is Persona by Stieff (of all people), and the B was a fortuitous match to my partner and kids' names--Berger. The odd flat one with the vertical dints is the rarest of all, and I really hunted for that--Raymond Loewy's Discovery for Wallace, 1957. Complete flop on the market. The Danish one, in rather thin 800 silver, is Embassy from and is dated 1933. The weird medallion one is by the very famous Philo Gilbert, who sold his manufacturing rights to John Cook of NY in 1867. In the upper slide, my favorite is Reed & Barton's La Parisienne--of which I'd never heard, and which I think is one of the great art nouveau designs America ever produced. Mine is also dated 1904. The kids used to always get the salad forks, but now I've graduated them to the big forks. It's a great way for a collector who doesn't really collect for himself to get his jollies...

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dragonflywink

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Registered: Dec 2002

iconnumber posted 05-26-2008 10:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dragonflywink     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Very eclectic collection of forks! The Scandinavian piece is Danish? Have always known it as the Norwegian "Diplomat" pattern, introduced in 1927 by Oslo Sølvvareversted (Nils Hansen).

~Cheryl

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ellabee

Posts: 306
Registered: Dec 2007

iconnumber posted 05-26-2008 11:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ellabee     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm drawn to that unusual one, second from the left in Ulysses' top picture. What pattern/maker is that?

This has been a fun and inspiring thread. Thanks for the license to scratch my Olive/Tuscan itch with a spoon or two for use with morning coffee!

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Marc

Posts: 414
Registered: Jun 2002

iconnumber posted 05-27-2008 09:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi there ellabee,

I thought the pattern was Empress by Gorham and when I checked it out in Turner that is what it was.. Made by Gorham and introduced in 1885. Neat pattern and usually fairly heavy.

Hope this helps

Marc

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Marc

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iconnumber posted 05-27-2008 12:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi there,

Here are the forks that we use at home on a regular basis. There is one of them that I have no information on and that is # 9. The back is marked "ADRA STERLING" and farther down the handle "Hand Worked".


1. Jubilee by Reed & Barton, sterling
2. Diamond by Reed & Barton, sterling
3. Beaded (sort of) RT & Co., coin
4. Violet by Whiting, sterling
5. ? made in Austria by L. Jarosinski & J. Vaugoin .800
6. Argo by Jensen (Denmark) sterling
7. ? by Jensen (Denmark) stainless
8. ? French .950
9. ? country? "ADRA STERLING" "Hand Worked".
10. ? by Chor (Denmark) sterling
11 ? by Franz Bahner (Germany) .800 retailers mark "Eugen Markus"

Fun forks for everyday!

Marc

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FredZ

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iconnumber posted 05-27-2008 02:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FredZ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have seen several piece marked ADRA and many have wool handles. I have heard there is an Adler connection to these pieces. Hopefully someone will find the link to the maker.

Fred

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dragonflywink

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Registered: Dec 2002

iconnumber posted 05-27-2008 05:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dragonflywink     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Marc, #7 looks like it might be the Henning Koppel designed Holiday I pattern, introduced in 1975. #10 is Cohr's Sparta pattern.

~Cheryl

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Ulysses Dietz
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iconnumber posted 06-03-2008 09:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ulysses Dietz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oops! Danish/Embassy--Norwegian/Diplomat--you can see how my mind (dis)associates.

And #8 looks completely French--even the American imitations look American...#11 surprised me--I'd assumed it was Shreve or someone like that.

Anyone have any random "Royal Danish" by International? I acquired a place setting of that for the Museum from one of our docents, who got it as wedding silver in 1948. I remember hearing someone say (or read somewhere?) that Royal Danish was designed by International's "legal department," because it's so dangerously close to (what? Acorn?) Jensen.

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Marc

Posts: 414
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iconnumber posted 06-03-2008 10:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi Ulysses,

Yes, a little of it (Royal Danish that is).
it is a midlevel pattern in popularity and it does look very much like 'Acorn' by Jensen. RD
has a nice feel and looks classy, at 1/3 the price.

Marc

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Marc

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iconnumber posted 06-11-2008 07:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi again,

Here is a front and back photo of #11, the unknown pattern by Franz Bahner (Germany) .800 retailers mark "Eugen Markus". The surface is entirely hand hammered.

Marc

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