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Author Topic:   Aaron Spelling
jersey

Posts: 1202
Registered: Feb 2005

iconnumber posted 03-27-2009 07:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jersey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A great talent & too bad he is gone, but I wish I had his money. I just read this, that along with his home now being up for sale, it states that it includes a humidity-controlled silver storage room! Way to go Aaron! Wonder where the silver is now?

Jersey

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Hose_dk

Posts: 396
Registered: May 2008

iconnumber posted 03-28-2009 05:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hose_dk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No envy - I am alive.
But most off all my antique silver is in use. No special conditions just plane storage - and daily use of the antique. When I eat fish I use a fishspade anno 1799 - that what silver is ment to be. Not stored in a "museum"

and sorry no disrespect for the film man

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bascall

Posts: 1621
Registered: Nov 99

iconnumber posted 03-28-2009 10:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I can see the need for humidity control for silver gelatin film, but not just for silver. Anybody care to explain or did the authors of the "piece" miss a detail? Or more likely am I missing the point?


[This message has been edited by bascall (edited 03-28-2009).]

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Polly

Posts: 1843
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 03-28-2009 12:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Perhaps the humidity control protects wood or ivory handles on teapots?

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Dale

Posts: 2132
Registered: Nov 2002

iconnumber posted 03-28-2009 01:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dale     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Assuming he lived somewhere near Los Angeles, which is a desert with very low humidity, something would be needed to preserve the ivory and wood as Polly suggests.

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bascall

Posts: 1621
Registered: Nov 99

iconnumber posted 03-28-2009 06:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I kind of go along with Hose_dk on the idea of humidity control for silver, but after doing a little browsing on the subject, it has become clear that the writers of the article had made no mistake about a room with humidity control for storing silver, and I was indeed missing the point.

Chemicals in the air, particularly sulphur, react with humidity to cause tarnish. If one has the means to have a room with humidity control, it is an ideal solution to the problem. Without humidity the formation of a patina will stalled which would work well for rare coins.

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Hose_dk

Posts: 396
Registered: May 2008

iconnumber posted 03-28-2009 06:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hose_dk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am sure that is objectively is a good idea. No questions asked.
But my point was - if you turn your home into a "refrigerator" to protect your collection - excuse me.

I collect for my pleasure - using not observing.
And by using I "destroy" but if it cannot be used - then it is a museum.
Thats not what I see in hawing a home.

[This message has been edited by Hose_dk (edited 03-28-2009).]

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doc

Posts: 701
Registered: Jul 2003

iconnumber posted 03-29-2009 05:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for doc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This actually ties in nicely with a question that I have with respect to the effect of humidity on tarnish. This is highly unscientific, but our gas heating system is equipped with a built-in humidifier. As this is a new home for us, this is my first winter in the house and I have noticed that my silver has tarnished much quicker in the past few months,starting not long after we turned on the humidity control.

As this also the first home in which I have had gas heat, I was wondering if that might also create additional tarnishing.

[This message has been edited by doc (edited 03-29-2009).]

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Paul Lemieux

Posts: 1755
Registered: Apr 2000

iconnumber posted 03-29-2009 06:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul Lemieux     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When I lived in Boston, my apartment in a Victorian house had old-school radiator heating, and my silver did not tarnish much. My first apt in NYC was a recently-updated building with a more modern style of gas heating (believe with a built in humidifier), and my silver tarnished almost more quickly than I could polish it. My current place is an older building, also with radiator heating, no humidifier, and since moving here I have noticed a real drop in tarnish once again.

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jersey

Posts: 1202
Registered: Feb 2005

iconnumber posted 03-29-2009 09:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jersey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi Hose_dk!
My guess perhaps would be that the family may have entertained frequently but perhaps with different selections of silver for their table (or not) etc., they chose to keep the silver in a controlled environment so as not to keep polishing all the time (whether they had help or not).

Jersey

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Polly

Posts: 1843
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 03-29-2009 09:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Add me to the list of anecdotal evidence. I live in an old NYC building with c. 1920 radiators (which make the most fascinating banging and hissing noises all winter). My silver tarnishes much less during winters than summers--which are hot and humid, with no air conditioning except in the bedroom, which is not where the silver lives.

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Dale

Posts: 2132
Registered: Nov 2002

iconnumber posted 03-30-2009 02:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dale     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When I have lived with a steam heat radiator system, I had very little tarnish. When I had a forced air gas heat, my silver tarnished like crazy. With hot water radiators, almost no tarnishing. With a floor furnace, instant tarnish. The distinction is not with the source of heat: oil, gas etc; but with the delivery method. A forced air system, where the air is heated by passing over gas flames is dangerous for silver. A gas fired boiler for steam or hot water is not. Now that I live in a place where there really is no cold weather, even if people put on earmuffs when the temperature hits 60', my silver does not tarnish much.

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Dale

Posts: 2132
Registered: Nov 2002

iconnumber posted 03-30-2009 02:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dale     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I grew up in an 1869 house. The original radiators are still in use. A steam system is expensive to install, but this one is still working after 140 years of upper midwest winters.

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agleopar

Posts: 824
Registered: Jun 2004

iconnumber posted 03-30-2009 09:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for agleopar     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi Doc, Bascall,Dale, Paul and Polly have summed up the gas/steam heat - its about sulfides in the gas.

If one lived in the country in land there would be little pollutants in the air but if you lived in an urban area and or near the sea (especially if it is humid) then tarnish would happen quite quickly. If you had air conditioning that would help. In NYC in the summer with the windows open silver would tarnish faster than in the winter... Now that air quality is so much better in cities I believe silver tarnishes less fast than pre 1970's!

There is a neat microcrystalline wax I have used for a long time called Renaissance Wax (I found it here for the best price);
www.conservationresources.com

Get the small tin because a tiny amount on the tip of your baby finger (really) will coat a few square inches quickly and it is invisible and odorless. I put it on silver that is going to be on the self and it retards tarnish well.

[This message has been edited by agleopar (edited 03-30-2009).]

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ahwt

Posts: 2022
Registered: Mar 2003

iconnumber posted 03-30-2009 05:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ahwt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree that the forced air system must play a major role in circulation the tarnishing agents around ones home. I have a dealer friend that lives in Dallas and he has seen extreme tarnishing of silver that was in homes close to oil and gas rigs. Sulphur is just in the air out there.
Maybe the clean coal industry will come up with something that we can put in our air return filters to neutralize the sulfur.

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bascall

Posts: 1621
Registered: Nov 99

iconnumber posted 04-06-2009 08:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bascall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From “House Beautiful,“ December 1903, directions written in 1737 by Paul de Lamarie:
    “Rules to keep the Plate clean from the Silversmith that made it. Clean it now and then with only warm water and soap, with a Spunge, and wash it with clean water, and dry it very well with a soft Linnen Cloth, and keep it in a dry place, for the damp with spoyle it.”

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vathek

Posts: 961
Registered: Jun 99

iconnumber posted 04-06-2009 12:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for vathek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
hmmm, wonder what soap was used?

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ellabee

Posts: 306
Registered: Dec 2007

iconnumber posted 04-06-2009 10:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ellabee     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dale: Assuming he lived somewhere near Los Angeles, which is a desert with very low humidity

L.A. is not desert-like along the coast, where many entertainment people live (Malibu, Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, Venice, Manhattan Beach, etc.). There's a ton of fog at night, and sea air -- great for the soul, terrible for silver.

[This message has been edited by ellabee (edited 04-06-2009).]

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