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Author Topic:   Pitchers
ahwt

Posts: 2173
Registered: Mar 2003

iconnumber posted 09-01-2017 11:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ahwt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote



Above are two unmarked silver plated water pitchers that I think were made in the United States in the late 1800s. The styles are similar to ones that could be found on solid silver pitchers with the attractive repoussé flowers on one and engine turned decorations on the other. The monogram and design on the one on the left is repeated on both sides of the pitcher. The one feature that I have not seen on solid silver pitchers is the open work design of the base.

The other pitcher has an attractive naturalistic handle with a grape and leaf milled band on the base. These could be used a pitchers, but they do make great vases for flowers.

I put these on just to explore the great silver plated items that were made through the years.

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Scott Martin
Forum Master

Posts: 11377
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 09-02-2017 10:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They are great!
I really like the engine turning.

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 09-02-2017 11:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pretty! I'm surprised and impressed with the handwork that often went into silverplate. You'd think the cheaper material would mean less care and labor would go into making it, but it's often just as carefully and elaborately made as solid silver.

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ahwt

Posts: 2173
Registered: Mar 2003

iconnumber posted 09-02-2017 07:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ahwt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
These pitchers, sometimes called ewers, have a narrower neck than the kind I like to use for water or other liquid. The narrow neck makes it almost impossible to clean the inside, but a neck this size is good for holding flowers. One article I read said that pitchers were normally called jugs in England. I think the form shown make really nice vases.
We found these pitchers at an antique show for about the price of a meal for two at a nice restaurant. I guess that is an indication that they are not very popular.

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agleopar

Posts: 847
Registered: Jun 2004

iconnumber posted 09-02-2017 10:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for agleopar     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ahwt, the open work typical of silver plate is cast in a lead based metal. The reason you don't see similar designs in sterling is that they would be much to weighty. One equivalent is the chased and pierced sterling gallery or foot sometimes with cast appliqués but the weight and feel comes out with a much more refined feel than the lead modeled SP ones.

I agree that the work in much of silver plate, at least the earlier ones is equal to that of sterling. A baby cup by Gorham in 1870 was $12 wholesale -1/2 was the silver. So the same cup with the same engraving, cast handle, foot, etc. was almost $6 cheaper. That I imagine was a big difference to the next group of consumers under the very wealthy!

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ahwt

Posts: 2173
Registered: Mar 2003

iconnumber posted 09-03-2017 11:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ahwt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks agleopar for the explanation. Sometimes cost affects design and silver plating allowed designers more freedom in form.
There was a later time period in silver plating when the silver plate added was too thin and wore off too soon.

[This message has been edited by ahwt (edited 09-04-2017).]

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nautilusjv

Posts: 249
Registered: Nov 2008

iconnumber posted 10-04-2017 01:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for nautilusjv     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The pitchers are gorgeous ahwt! And it's great to use them for flowers.

I have long admired silverplate particularly Aesthetic and early on in my collecting life it was all I could afford. Apparently, if I am remembering correctly for a period in the 19th century silverplate held a greater market share than sterling. Judy Redfield wrote a great article about silverplate where I believe she examines that fact. You can easily find her article online.

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 10-04-2017 04:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Do you have trouble with your roses dying when you put them in those jugs? I would worry that it would be hard to clean them thoroughly, and bacteria remaining in vases can kill flowers. They do look lovely with flowers in them.

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ahwt

Posts: 2173
Registered: Mar 2003

iconnumber posted 10-04-2017 10:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ahwt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Polly, I do clean the pitchers out with soapy water and a brush, but the inside never gets polished. We have used the pitchers several times for flowers and have not noticed any problem so far. The tarnished inside is not very attractive, but it seems clean enough for flowers.
Silver is a metal that kills germs and that may also help.

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Polly

Posts: 1939
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 10-04-2017 10:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you can reach inside with a brush, I'm sure it's fine. I don't think tarnish is an issue, just dead leaves and stems.

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