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tline3open  Cute little cup--where, when?

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Author Topic:   Cute little cup--where, when?
Polly

Posts: 1868
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 02-27-2018 11:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sweet little cup, seller told me it tested as "coin silver." It's exactly 2 inches tall and 1 1/2 inches in diameter at the top (suggesting it was made somewhere where people measured things in inches). It's heavy for its size. No marks I can find, just wrigglework swags and a wrigglework monogram (?) on the bottom. One photo shows it with a pencil for scale.

Any guesses as to country and period of origin?



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Polly

Posts: 1868
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 02-27-2018 11:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

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Scott Martin
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Posts: 11265
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 02-27-2018 01:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That may be the best freehand wiggle work I've seen.

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Polly

Posts: 1868
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 02-27-2018 01:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Isn't it charmingly wiggled?

Do you think Scandinavian or German, maybe? They liked wrigglework / wigglework. Or a US area with lots of immigrants from there?

It's so little--for strong alcohol, maybe, like a shot glass? Or a toy?

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Hose_dk

Posts: 396
Registered: May 2008

iconnumber posted 12-09-2018 01:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hose_dk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
the s -- suggest son in swedish norweigian or danish-
the look of item suggest 19th century

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Scott Martin
Forum Master

Posts: 11265
Registered: Apr 93

iconnumber posted 12-09-2018 03:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott Martin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you.
I have seen the S underscore before and have always wondered.

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ahwt

Posts: 2058
Registered: Mar 2003

iconnumber posted 12-09-2018 05:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ahwt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I missed this the first time. That is a great cup. I love the strap handle with the leaf attachment. The silversmith who did this had a wonderful sense of design.

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Polly

Posts: 1868
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 12-09-2018 09:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you, Hose & ahwt.

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Hose_dk

Posts: 396
Registered: May 2008

iconnumber posted 12-13-2018 03:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hose_dk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ahwt:
I missed this the first time. That is a great cup. I love the strap handle with the leaf attachment. The silversmith who did this had a wonderful sense of design.

but not skilled. The nside is work of an amateur.

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ahwt

Posts: 2058
Registered: Mar 2003

iconnumber posted 12-14-2018 05:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ahwt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The inside is a bit of a mystery. I wonder if the extra silver soldering was done later by someone other than the original silversmith. The added silver does not seem to provide any function or purpose as the seams already appear to be intact.

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Hose_dk

Posts: 396
Registered: May 2008

iconnumber posted 12-14-2018 03:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hose_dk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
that i a likely explanation

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Polly

Posts: 1868
Registered: Nov 2004

iconnumber posted 01-10-2019 01:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Polly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I took an intro metalworking class at the Y one time, so I could understand better how silver items are made. I wasn't very good at it (but then, it was just one introductory class--maybe I would have gotten better if I'd kept at it). Anyway, the way soldering works is you carefully prepare the surfaces that need to be joined so that they fit together as perfectly as possible. Then you place snips of solder--metal with a lower melting point than the main metal--along the seam, and you heat it until the solder melts and flows into the seam, then hardens and joins it. People who are not so well practiced at this (like me!) often end up with lumps of solder showing along the seams, like in this cup. It's more likely to be a sign of a not-so-skillful smith than of someone adding solder later.

I have noticed a few otherwise extremely well-made pieces of silver with extra solder showing on the underside. I think getting the solder to flow invisibly was not a priority for all silversmiths.

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agleopar

Posts: 837
Registered: Jun 2004

iconnumber posted 05-27-2019 10:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for agleopar     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just saw this Polly and I’d like to add that although you are right in all you say about amateur soldering this has the hallmarks (pun intended!) of provincial work. Meaning when and where this was made the Smith was working with very basic tools. The other consideration is how he/she was soldering. It’s likely that a charcoal forge with bellows was used. This means the paillons (little bits of solder) are placed with flux and then the cup is put on the hot coals, the bellows increase the heat until the solder flows.

That is the theory but actually doing it - I can not imagine. The lack of control compared to what we use now...

So, when I look at this cup I see what is a masterful job which was done very low tech. That includes the wriggle work. It is the easiest way to add decoration but this is done by someone who has done it a lot but is self taught (I don’t think anyone ever was taught wriggle work!).

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